When considering DUPIXENT for patients aged 6 years and older with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis

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Clinical trial data in patients aged 6 years and older, real-world data in adults, HCP stories, and patient stories—these are stories about DUPIXENT, your first-line systemic therapy when topical prescription therapies are not enough.

See Clinical Results
Overview

Many patients are still in need of relief.

Over 2 in 5 children aged 6 to 11 years with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis are estimated to be uncontrolled despite treatment.1,a

Identify Patients

a Uncontrolled moderate disease is defined as ≥2 prescriptions of medium-to-super-potent corticosteroids/topical calcineurin inhibitors over a 1-year observation period and all severe patients are determined as uncontrolled.

Get Their Stories

“...Mom described it as his skin
was like an active volcano...”

Watch Dr Soung

“As a mom, I felt helpless...”

Watch Annie's Story

DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

Please view entire video for clinical trial efficacy and safety data and accompanying link for full Prescribing Information.

Hear Dr Soung's DUPIXENT story

INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION
DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

Hi, I’m Dr Jennifer Soung with the “Beyond the Surface” Series.

Of the patients that I’ve treated, one particular patient comes to mind. He’s an eight-year-old boy who is Southeast Asian, and was referred to me by his pediatrician because of really stubborn disease.

In skin of color, it can be harder to distinguish, or make a diagnosis because it may not look so typical. The plaques can be more lichenified and thicker, and so may look like psoriasis. The appearance of the lesions are different, as well, in skin of color because the redness isn’t always so bright.

Mom described it as his skin was on fire. Even at times, she said it’s like an active volcano. It was always brewing; he never had clear skin. He wanted to hide his eczema. Kids at school started to notice and would ask what was going on. Really, that sense of lack of control over his skin, his itching.

As soon as the FDA approved it, I remember that day, he was one of my first patients that I called. And the parents came right in. In this situation, the parents knew that they needed something more, and wanted to keep his inflammation and his atopic dermatitis controlled. When I prescribe DUPIXENT to my patient, I always share with them the most common adverse events.

The most common adverse reactions, incidence of greater than or equal to 1% at Week 16 in clinical trials, were injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex infections, and dry eye.

After starting DUPIXENT, on his first visit back to the office, I didn’t even need to ask him how he was doing because he just smiled at me.

I knew that we were on the right path to healing his skin because he had described a relief in his itch. That was a big accomplishment.

I’ve seen him improve over several weeks, and his skin healed really well. He was wearing short sleeves and shorts when he came to the office. He no longer felt like he had to cover all his skin.

I remember mom and dad telling me it was like a huge weight that had been lifted off of them…because they saw that this medicine was actually helping relieve that itch and break that itch-scratch cycle.

So the family, as well as the patient, have been thrilled. And even the little boy, my patient, says that the injection now is worth it.

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION: DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity reactions, including generalized urticaria, rash, erythema nodosum, anaphylaxis and serum sickness or serum sickness-like reactions, were reported in <1% of subjects who received DUPIXENT in clinical trials. If a clinically significant hypersensitivity reaction occurs, institute appropriate therapy and discontinue DUPIXENT.

Conjunctivitis and Keratitis: Conjunctivitis and keratitis occurred more frequently in atopic dermatitis subjects who received DUPIXENT. Conjunctivitis was the most frequently reported eye disorder. Most subjects with conjunctivitis or keratitis recovered or were recovering during the treatment period. Advise patients to report new onset or worsening eye symptoms to their healthcare provider.

Reduction of Corticosteroid Dosage: Do not discontinue systemic, topical or inhaled corticosteroids abruptly upon initiation with DUPIXENT. Reductions in corticosteroid dose, if appropriate, should be gradual and performed under the direct supervision of a physician. Reduction in corticosteroid dose may be associated with systemic withdrawal symptoms and/or unmask conditions previously suppressed by systemic corticosteroid therapy.

Atopic Dermatitis Patients with Comorbid Asthma: Advise patients not to adjust or stop their asthma treatments without consultation with their physicians.

Parasitic (Helminth) Infections: It is unknown if DUPIXENT will influence the immune response against helminth infections. Treat patients with pre-existing helminth infections before initiating therapy with DUPIXENT. If patients become infected while receiving treatment with DUPIXENT and do not respond to anti-helminth treatment, discontinue treatment with DUPIXENT until the infection resolves.

ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1% at Week 16) in adult patients with atopic dermatitis are injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eye. The safety profile in children and adolescents through Week 16 was similar to that of adults with atopic dermatitis. In an open-label extension study, the long-term safety profile of DUPIXENT in adolescents and children observed through Week 52 was consistent with that seen in adults with atopic dermatitis.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Avoid use of live vaccines in patients treated with DUPIXENT.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Pregnancy: There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to DUPIXENT during pregnancy. Healthcare providers and patients may call 1-877-311-8972 or go to https://mothertobaby.org/ongoing-study/dupixent/ to enroll in or obtain information about the registry. Available data from case reports and case series with DUPIXENT use in pregnant women have not identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Human IgG antibodies are known to cross the placental barrier; therefore, DUPIXENT may be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus.
  • Lactation: There are no data on the presence of DUPIXENT in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Maternal IgG is known to be present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for DUPIXENT and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from DUPIXENT or from the underlying maternal condition.

Please see accompanying link to full Prescribing Information.

Hear Annie's DUPIXENT story

Annie: It was hard to not have a solution that worked for me. There was always something that I needed to do, always like a medicine I needed to take or a topical that I had to put on my skin.

Sue: As a mom, I felt helpless, and we really felt out of control, and we needed to find something different that would work for her.

Annie’s eczema specialist knew about DUPIXENT and thought that Annie was appropriate for it.

Annie: Since starting DUPIXENT, my skin is a lot more clear. It’s a lot calmer.

Sue: We did notice a difference within the first few weeks, and it has continually improved.

Annie: My life doesn’t revolve around my skin anymore.

Sue: Now, when she goes out and plays volleyball or hangs out with her friends, she can just be a kid, and that is a huge relief as a parent.

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION: DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity reactions, including generalized urticaria, rash, erythema nodosum, anaphylaxis and serum sickness or serum sickness-like reactions, were reported in <1% of subjects who received DUPIXENT in clinical trials. If a clinically significant hypersensitivity reaction occurs, institute appropriate therapy and discontinue DUPIXENT.

Conjunctivitis and Keratitis: Conjunctivitis and keratitis occurred more frequently in atopic dermatitis subjects who received DUPIXENT. Conjunctivitis was the most frequently reported eye disorder. Most subjects with conjunctivitis or keratitis recovered or were recovering during the treatment period. Advise patients to report new onset or worsening eye symptoms to their healthcare provider.

Reduction of Corticosteroid Dosage: Do not discontinue systemic, topical or inhaled corticosteroids abruptly upon initiation with DUPIXENT. Reductions in corticosteroid dose, if appropriate, should be gradual and performed under the direct supervision of a physician. Reduction in corticosteroid dose may be associated with systemic withdrawal symptoms and/or unmask conditions previously suppressed by systemic corticosteroid therapy.

Atopic Dermatitis Patients with Comorbid Asthma: Advise patients not to adjust or stop their asthma treatments without consultation with their physicians.

Parasitic (Helminth) Infections: It is unknown if DUPIXENT will influence the immune response against helminth infections. Treat patients with pre-existing helminth infections before initiating therapy with DUPIXENT. If patients become infected while receiving treatment with DUPIXENT and do not respond to anti-helminth treatment, discontinue treatment with DUPIXENT until the infection resolves.

ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1% at Week 16) in adult patients with atopic dermatitis are injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eye. The safety profile in children and adolescents through Week 16 was similar to that of adults with atopic dermatitis. In an open-label extension study, the long-term safety profile of DUPIXENT in adolescents and children observed through Week 52 was consistent with that seen in adults with atopic dermatitis.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Avoid use of live vaccines in patients treated with DUPIXENT.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Pregnancy: There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to DUPIXENT during pregnancy. Healthcare providers and patients may call 1-877-311-8972 or go to https://mothertobaby.org/ongoing-study/dupixent/ to enroll in or obtain information about the registry. Available data from case reports and case series with DUPIXENT use in pregnant women have not identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Human IgG antibodies are known to cross the placental barrier; therefore, DUPIXENT may be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus.
  • Lactation: There are no data on the presence of DUPIXENT in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Maternal IgG is known to be present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for DUPIXENT and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from DUPIXENT or from the underlying maternal condition.

Please see accompanying link to full Prescribing Information.

Consider what’s going on beyond the surface when approaching patients with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. Take the quiz.

Even nonlesional skin in atopic dermatitis is not normal skin.2-4

True

False

You answered “true,” and you’re right. You answered “false,” and that is incorrect. Though normal looking, even nonlesional eczematous skin has persistent, underlying inflammation.2-4

Go Beyond the Surface

“She felt as if her skin
was crawling”

Watch Dr Burnette

“He described his disease
as unpredictable...”

Watch Tomas Chao, PA-C

DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

Please view entire video for clinical trial efficacy and safety data and accompanying link for full Prescribing Information.

Hear Dr Burnette's DUPIXENT story

INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION
DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

Hi, I’m Dr Autumn Burnette with the “Beyond the Surface” Series.

So I have a patient who’s in her late 30s. It’s a professional female. She has skin of color. I would describe the severity of this patient to be moderate-to-severe.

She described the itch as being unbearable, and chronic, and throughout the day. And she even reported to me that she felt as if her skin was crawling.

And my patient works in healthcare. So it was very concerning to her, not only cosmetically and the appearance of her skin being in the healthcare setting, but also the burden of having to frequently hand wash, which may even exacerbate her current moderate-to-severe condition.

What I’ve observed in patients with skin of color is that it’s a more heterogeneous type of appearance of the lesions on the skin. She mentioned having lesions on her skin that were changing the actual pigment of her skin. And she even described to me that she didn’t even actually know the true pigment of her skin, because most of her skin was covered in atopic dermatitis lesions.

She wanted my help and I actually had help to give her. I explained to her that DUPIXENT was an injectable monoclonal antibody that was a biological approach to managing her moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

When discussing the safety profile of DUPIXENT with my patients, I do explain to them that, of course, every patient responds to drugs differently.

The most common adverse reactions, incidence greater than or equal to 1% at Week 16 in clinical trials, were injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eye.

At her first follow-up, which was approximately four weeks after we started DUPIXENT, the patient mentioned to me that her itch level was greatly diminished, which I was excited for. She was able to expose her hands and arms. She was actually getting compliments from people about the appearance of her skin.

I’ve been very excited to continue along this journey with her, and she has been excited about continuing DUPIXENT therapy.

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION: DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity reactions, including generalized urticaria, rash, erythema nodosum, anaphylaxis and serum sickness or serum sickness-like reactions, were reported in <1% of subjects who received DUPIXENT in clinical trials. If a clinically significant hypersensitivity reaction occurs, institute appropriate therapy and discontinue DUPIXENT.

Conjunctivitis and Keratitis: Conjunctivitis and keratitis occurred more frequently in atopic dermatitis subjects who received DUPIXENT. Conjunctivitis was the most frequently reported eye disorder. Most subjects with conjunctivitis or keratitis recovered or were recovering during the treatment period. Advise patients to report new onset or worsening eye symptoms to their healthcare provider.

Reduction of Corticosteroid Dosage: Do not discontinue systemic, topical or inhaled corticosteroids abruptly upon initiation with DUPIXENT. Reductions in corticosteroid dose, if appropriate, should be gradual and performed under the direct supervision of a physician. Reduction in corticosteroid dose may be associated with systemic withdrawal symptoms and/or unmask conditions previously suppressed by systemic corticosteroid therapy.

Atopic Dermatitis Patients with Comorbid Asthma: Advise patients not to adjust or stop their asthma treatments without consultation with their physicians.

Parasitic (Helminth) Infections: It is unknown if DUPIXENT will influence the immune response against helminth infections. Treat patients with pre-existing helminth infections before initiating therapy with DUPIXENT. If patients become infected while receiving treatment with DUPIXENT and do not respond to anti-helminth treatment, discontinue treatment with DUPIXENT until the infection resolves.

ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1% at Week 16) in adult patients with atopic dermatitis are injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eye. The safety profile in children and adolescents through Week 16 was similar to that of adults with atopic dermatitis. In an open-label extension study, the long-term safety profile of DUPIXENT in adolescents and children observed through Week 52 was consistent with that seen in adults with atopic dermatitis.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Avoid use of live vaccines in patients treated with DUPIXENT.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Pregnancy: There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to DUPIXENT during pregnancy. Healthcare providers and patients may call 1-877-311-8972 or go to https://mothertobaby.org/ongoing-study/dupixent/ to enroll in or obtain information about the registry. Available data from case reports and case series with DUPIXENT use in pregnant women have not identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Human IgG antibodies are known to cross the placental barrier; therefore, DUPIXENT may be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus.
  • Lactation: There are no data on the presence of DUPIXENT in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Maternal IgG is known to be present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for DUPIXENT and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from DUPIXENT or from the underlying maternal condition.

Please see accompanying link to full Prescribing Information.

Hear Tomas Chao's DUPIXENT story

INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION
DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

Hi, I’m TJ Chao with the “Beyond the Surface” Series.

So I have a 55-year-old patient who I’ve been seeing now for about 17 years, and he played in a cover band for a major rock group.

He had moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis that was affecting his body, his face, as well as his hands. So when my patient first came into the practice, he described his disease as unpredictable. He never knew when it was gonna cause a problem. And it really affected his ability to play his music and feel comfortable.

My patient would say that their skin was very red. It was thick, and the more he rubbed his skin, the thicker it became. But his worst complaint were his hands. His hands would essentially peel, scale. When he’s trying to play in the band, his fingers will literally crack and bleed while he’s on stage.

My patient described itching that he would have just about at every point during the day. He would get up and try to put lotion on his skin throughout the night in order to feel better. He realized that he’s got to make a big change in the way he’s been treating his disease.

When I described DUPIXENT to my patient, the goal and hope was it was going to help his skin, not only in the short-term, but also in the long-term. We had been treating his disease for so long episodically.

With my patient, we talked about the risks and safety profile of DUPIXENT. The most common adverse reactions, incidence greater than or equal to 1% at Week 16 in clinical trials, were injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eyes.

When I prescribed DUPIXENT to my patient, within a few weeks, he sensed a difference in his body. But what was most dramatic was the improvement in his hands and especially his fingertips. His hands were slightly red, but not eczematous as they were before. He was less itchy.

I think the most pivotal point was when he went on a trip and for the first time he was sweating, he was hot on stage, the lights were beaming down on him…he looked a lot more comfortable.

He realized that DUPIXENT was treating him not only on the outside what he could see and feel, but it was also treating him on the inside. He realized that the disease was now under control. He has something that’s effective short- and long-term.

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INDICATION
DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATION: DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity reactions, including generalized urticaria, rash, erythema nodosum, anaphylaxis and serum sickness or serum sickness-like reactions, were reported in <1% of subjects who received DUPIXENT in clinical trials. If a clinically significant hypersensitivity reaction occurs, institute appropriate therapy and discontinue DUPIXENT.

Conjunctivitis and Keratitis: Conjunctivitis and keratitis occurred more frequently in atopic dermatitis subjects who received DUPIXENT. Conjunctivitis was the most frequently reported eye disorder. Most subjects with conjunctivitis or keratitis recovered or were recovering during the treatment period. Advise patients to report new onset or worsening eye symptoms to their healthcare provider.

Reduction of Corticosteroid Dosage: Do not discontinue systemic, topical or inhaled corticosteroids abruptly upon initiation with DUPIXENT. Reductions in corticosteroid dose, if appropriate, should be gradual and performed under the direct supervision of a physician. Reduction in corticosteroid dose may be associated with systemic withdrawal symptoms and/or unmask conditions previously suppressed by systemic corticosteroid therapy.

Atopic Dermatitis Patients with Comorbid Asthma: Advise patients not to adjust or stop their asthma treatments without consultation with their physicians.

Parasitic (Helminth) Infections: It is unknown if DUPIXENT will influence the immune response against helminth infections. Treat patients with pre-existing helminth infections before initiating therapy with DUPIXENT. If patients become infected while receiving treatment with DUPIXENT and do not respond to anti-helminth treatment, discontinue treatment with DUPIXENT until the infection resolves.

ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1% at Week 16) in adult patients with atopic dermatitis are injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eye. The safety profile in children and adolescents through Week 16 was similar to that of adults with atopic dermatitis. In an open-label extension study, the long-term safety profile of DUPIXENT in adolescents and children observed through Week 52 was consistent with that seen in adults with atopic dermatitis.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Avoid use of live vaccines in patients treated with DUPIXENT.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Pregnancy: There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to DUPIXENT during pregnancy. Healthcare providers and patients may call 1-877-311-8972 or go to https://mothertobaby.org/ongoing-study/dupixent/ to enroll in or obtain information about the registry. Available data from case reports and case series with DUPIXENT use in pregnant women have not identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Human IgG antibodies are known to cross the placental barrier; therefore, DUPIXENT may be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus.
  • Lactation: There are no data on the presence of DUPIXENT in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Maternal IgG is known to be present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for DUPIXENT and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from DUPIXENT or from the underlying maternal condition.

Please see accompanying link to full Prescribing Information.

Use the slider to see before and after treatment with DUPIXENT.

Clinical Trial Results and Trial Designs

Adult
Adult Adolescent Child

This actual adult patient uncontrolled with topical Rx therapies achieved a 3-point improvement in IGA

Please note that this patient with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis was part of a DUPIXENT clinical study. Scoring was assessed by the treating physician. Because this patient was a real-world patient, other factors may have influenced their treatment results, and individual results may vary.

See clinical results
overview

This actual 12-year-old patient uncontrolled with topical Rx therapies achieved a 2-point improvement in IGA

Please note that this patient with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis was part of the Phase 3 adolescent DUPIXENT trial, with a baseline IGA of 4 and EASI of 31. Individual results may vary.

In this trial, a clinical responder was defined as a patient achieving IGA 0 or 1 and at least a 2-point improvement in baseline. This adolescent patient did not meet the primary endpoint in the clinical trial based on their IGA score at Week 16.5

See clinical results
overview

This actual 6-year-old patient uncontrolled with topical Rx therapies achieved a 3-point improvement in IGA

Please note that this patient with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis was part of the Phase 3 pediatric DUPIXENT trial (Trial 8). All patients were prescribed concomitant TCS based on the clinical trial program. Individual results may vary.10

See clinical results
overview

Signs of uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis may manifest differently in skin of color. Therefore, recognizing how erythema and other clinical signs may present in skin of color continues to be important.11,12

Which picture(s) are consistent with Atopic Dermatitis?
(Choose all that apply)

Submit

Answer: All the above
Edema, skin warmth, or scaling are some indications of underlying erythema, or in darker skin, it may appear violet.11,12

See how the signs of atopic dermatitis can manifest in skin of color.11,12

Download the Skin of Color Brochure

What's true about DUPIXENT? (Choose all that apply)

Submit

Answer: All the above

DUPIXENT is not an immunosuppressant and avoids broad immunosuppression5
It is unknown if DUPIXENT will influence the immune response against helminth infections

DUPIXENT does not require initial lab testing or ongoing lab monitoring,
according to the Prescribing Information5

99% of adult commercial patients nationally are covered for DUPIXENT, with
82% of those lives having to fail only 1 or 2 prescription topical treatments1,b

bData as of March 2021.

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References:

  1. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  2. De Benedetto A, Rafaels NM, McGirt LY, et al. Tight junction defects in patients with atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(3):773-786.
  3. Leung DY, Boguniewicz M, Howell MD, Nomura I, Hamid QA. New insights into atopic dermatitis. J Clin Invest. 2004;113(5):651-657.
  4. Suárez-Fariñas M, Tintle SJ, Shemer A, et al. Nonlesional atopic dermatitis skin is characterized by broad terminal differentiation defects and variable immune abnormalities. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(4):954-964.
  5. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information.
  6. Paller AS, Siegfried EC, Thaci D, et al. Efficacy and safety of dupilumab with concomitant topical steroids in children 6 to 11 years old with severe atopic dermatitis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Dermatol. 2020;156(1):44-56.
  7. Blauvelt A, de Bruin-Weller M, Gooderham M, et al. Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (LIBERTY AD CHRONOS): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2017;389(10086):2287-2303.
  8. Simpson EL, Bieber T, Guttman-Yassky E, et al; SOLO 1 and SOLO 2 Investigators. Two phase 3 trials of dupilumab versus placebo in atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2335-2348.
  9. Simpson EL, Paller AS, Siegfried EC, et al. Efficacy and safety of dupilumab in adolescents with uncontrolled moderate to severe atopic dermatitis: a phase 3 randomized clinical trial. JAMA Dermatol. 2020;156(1):44-56.
  10. Shumel B, Rossi AB. Dupilumab treatment provides multidimensional improvement of signs, symptoms, and quality of life in children with severe atopic dermatitis: a pictorial guide. Dermatologist. 2020;28(8):42-46.
  11. Kaufman BP, Guttman-Yassky E, Alexis AF. Atopic dermatitis in diverse racial and ethnic groups—variations in epidemiology, genetics, clinical presentation and treatment. Exp Dermatol. 2018;27(4):340-357.
  12. Vachiramon V, Hong LT, Thompson AE, Yosipovitch G. Atopic dermatitis in African American children: addressing unmet needs of a common disease. Pediatr Dermatol. 2012;29(4):395-402.