IDENTIFYING Patients

When topical Rx therapies are not enough, DUPIXENT is your first-line systemic treatment for patients 6+ years of age with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis

The following may indicate that your patient is appropriate for DUPIXENT

  • Have tried a variety of topical prescription therapies for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis and are still uncontrolled1
  • Suffer from inadequate control of pruritus1
  • Have ≥10% of their body covered with lesions and/or may involve problem areas, such as the face, hands, and feet2
  • Have moderate-to-severe erythema and moderate-to-severe papulation/infiltration (IGA 3 or 4)3

See below for pictures of patients with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis who might
be appropriate for DUPIXENT.

Struggling with steroid cycles

l'll try anything to heal my skin,
but I never succeed.
I always end
up with another cycle of steroids.
—Simon

Image of an actual
patient with
uncontrolled
moderate-to-severe
atopic dermatitis.
Story is inspired by
people who suffer
from atopic
dermatitis.

Signs and symptoms

  • His lesions generally appear on his legs, neck, upper chest, and back
  • He’s concerned that people are staring at his lesions
  • Has persistent itch despite having tried several therapeutic approaches

Treatment and goals

  • Has tried a variety of treatments including antihistamines, multiple topical prescription treatments, phototherapy, bleach baths, oatmeal baths, wet wraps, and dietary changes, but nothing provides sustained control
  • Wants a treatment that will have a lasting impact on his atopic dermatitis

Worried about her worsening moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis symptoms

It’s hard enough being a teenager. But it
feels like one big cruel joke when you
throw in the cracking, peeling, red skin.
—Whitney

Image of an actual
patient with
uncontrolled
moderate-to-severe
atopic dermatitis.
Story is inspired by
people who suffer
from atopic
dermatitis.

Signs and symptoms

  • Her lesions generally appear on her arms, legs, and feet
  • She’s constantly itching, and her lesion coverage has increased from 10% to 16% in the last year
  • She’s worried about how she’ll be able to conceal her lesions for an upcoming pool party

Treatment and goals

  • Has tried a variety of therapies, including topical prescription treatments, and has remained uncontrolled
  • Cannot maintain clear skin for long periods of time
  • Her mom wants to try another approach to treatment

Visible lesions and frequent itching

Every day was a struggle for him when it
came to his atopic dermatitis, but I felt
there was nothing I could do.
—Josh’s mother

Image of an actual
patient with
uncontrolled
moderate-to-severe
atopic dermatitis.
Story is inspired by
people who suffer
from atopic
dermatitis.

Signs and symptoms

  • He's frequently scratching his lesions, although he knows he shouldn’t
  • He thinks everyone makes fun of the way his skin looks

Treatment and goals

  • Has tried topical prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, and dietary changes
  • His parents are struggling to find a treatment that can help reduce the severity of his lesions

Battling intense, persistent itch

My scaly, scarred, itchy, dry skin has
me scratching all through the day
and night.
—Irene

Image of an actual
patient with
uncontrolled
moderate-to-severe
atopic dermatitis. Story is inspired by
people who suffer
from atopic
dermatitis.

Signs and symptoms

  • Her lesions affect multiple areas, covering 55% of her body
  • Her clothes, her sheets, her soap, her detergent, her diet, exercising, the sun—everything makes her itch. And traveling for work makes it even harder to manage it
  • She worries about how she will conceal her skin

Treatment and goals

  • Has tried multiple therapeutic approaches, including topical prescription treatments and alternative therapies, yet remains uncontrolled
  • Wants more than anything else to lessen her intense itching and achieve clearer skin

Finding it hard to hide her skin

My atopic dermatitis only covers a few
parts of my body—unfortunately, it is
always my hands, wrists, ankles, and neck.
—Heidi

Image of an actual
patient with
uncontrolled
moderate-to-severe
atopic dermatitis.
Story is inspired by
people who suffer
from atopic
dermatitis.

Signs and symptoms

  • She suffers from uncontrolled disease on 12% of her body
  • Her affected areas are minimal but very visible
  • Has to explain to the parents and children at day care that her condition is not contagious

Treatment and goals

  • Has tried multiple treatments, including topical prescription treatments
  • Wet wraps lessen the redness of her skin, but not the itching, and the process is time-consuming
  • Wants a treatment that helps clear her very visible problem areas

Fighting a losing battle with intense itch

I don’t want to scratch, but not scratching is impossible. My skin ends up paying the price.
—Eddie

Image of an actual
patient with
uncontrolled
moderate-to-severe
atopic dermatitis.
Story is inspired by
people who suffer
from atopic
dermatitis.

Signs and symptoms

  • He has dry, scaly, and red skin that itches incessantly
  • He experiences significant disease across his arms and trunk
  • He’s concerned about his hockey equipment exacerbating his signs and symptoms

Treatment and goals

  • Recently tried several dietary changes, increased water intake, and tried out new soaps and moisturizers—but they haven’t lessened his itch
  • Has tried a variety of prescription therapies, including topical prescription treatments, and has remained uncontrolled
  • Wants to control his persistent itch

References:

  1. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information.
  2. Boguniewicz M, Alexis AF, Beck LA, et al. Expert perspectives on management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: a multidisciplinary consensus addressing current and emerging therapies. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017;5(6):1519-1531.
  3. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Important Safety
Information and Indications

CONTRAINDICATION: DUPIXENT is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to dupilumab or any of its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, serum sickness or serum sickness-like reactions, angioedema, generalized urticaria, rash, erythema nodosum, and erythema multiforme have been reported. If a clinically significant hypersensitivity reaction occurs, institute appropriate therapy and discontinue DUPIXENT.

Conjunctivitis and Keratitis: Conjunctivitis and keratitis occurred more frequently in atopic dermatitis subjects who received DUPIXENT compared to those who received placebo, with conjunctivitis being the most frequently reported eye disorder. Conjunctivitis also occurred more frequently in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis subjects who received DUPIXENT compared to those who received placebo. Conjunctivitis and keratitis have been reported with DUPIXENT in postmarketing settings, predominantly in atopic dermatitis patients. Some patients reported visual disturbances (e.g. blurred vision) associated with conjunctivitis or keratitis. Advise patients to report new onset or worsening eye symptoms to their healthcare provider. Consider ophthalmological examination for patients who develop conjunctivitis that does not resolve following standard treatment or signs and symptoms suggestive of keratitis, as appropriate.

Eosinophilic Conditions: Patients being treated for asthma may present with serious systemic eosinophilia sometimes presenting with clinical features of eosinophilic pneumonia or vasculitis consistent with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), conditions which are often treated with systemic corticosteroid therapy. These events may be associated with the reduction of oral corticosteroid therapy. Healthcare providers should be alert to vasculitic rash, worsening pulmonary symptoms, cardiac complications, and/or neuropathy presenting in their patients with eosinophilia. Cases of eosinophilic pneumonia were reported in adult subjects who participated in the asthma development program and cases of vasculitis consistent with EGPA have been reported with DUPIXENT in adult subjects who participated in the asthma development program as well as in adult subjects with co-morbid asthma in the CRSwNP development program. A causal association between DUPIXENT and these conditions has not been established.

Acute Asthma Symptoms or Deteriorating Disease: Do not use DUPIXENT to treat acute asthma symptoms, acute exacerbations, acute bronchospasm or status asthmaticus. Patients should seek medical advice if their asthma remains uncontrolled or worsens after initiation of DUPIXENT.

Risk Associated with Abrupt Reduction of Corticosteroid Dosage: Do not discontinue systemic, topical, or inhaled corticosteroids abruptly upon initiation of DUPIXENT. Reductions in corticosteroid dose, if appropriate, should be gradual and performed under the direct supervision of a healthcare provider. Reduction in corticosteroid dose may be associated with systemic withdrawal symptoms and/or unmask conditions previously suppressed by systemic corticosteroid therapy.

Patients with Co-morbid Asthma: Advise patients with atopic dermatitis or CRSwNP who have co-morbid asthma not to adjust or stop their asthma treatments without consultation with their physicians.

Arthralgia: Arthralgia has been reported with the use of DUPIXENT with some patients reporting gait disturbances or decreased mobility associated with joint symptoms; some cases resulted in hospitalization. Advise patients to report new onset or worsening joint symptoms. If symptoms persist or worsen, consider rheumatological evaluation and/or discontinuation of DUPIXENT.

Parasitic (Helminth) Infections: It is unknown if DUPIXENT will influence the immune response against helminth infections. Treat patients with pre-existing helminth infections before initiating therapy with DUPIXENT. If patients become infected while receiving treatment with DUPIXENT and do not respond to anti-helminth treatment, discontinue treatment with DUPIXENT until the infection resolves. Helminth infections (5 cases of enterobiasis and 1 case of ascariasis) were reported in pediatric patients 6 to 11 years old in the pediatric asthma development program.

Vaccinations: Consider completing all age-appropriate vaccinations as recommended by current immunization guidelines prior to initiating DUPIXENT. Avoid use of live vaccines in patients treated with DUPIXENT.

ADVERSE REACTIONS:
  • Atopic dermatitis: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1% at Week 16) in adult patients are injection site reactions, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, oral herpes, keratitis, eye pruritus, other herpes simplex virus infection, and dry eye. The safety profile in children and adolescents through Week 16 was similar to that of adults with atopic dermatitis. In an open-label extension study, the long-term safety profile of DUPIXENT in adolescents and children observed through Week 52 was consistent with that seen in adults with atopic dermatitis.
  • Asthma: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1%) are injection site reactions, oropharyngeal pain, and eosinophilia.
  • Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥1%) are injection site reactions, eosinophilia, insomnia, toothache, gastritis, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis.
USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS
  • Pregnancy: A pregnancy exposure registry monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to DUPIXENT during pregnancy. To enroll or obtain information call 1-877-311-8972 or go to https://mothertobaby.org/ongoing-study/dupixent/. Available data from case reports and case series with DUPIXENT use in pregnant women have not identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Human IgG antibodies are known to cross the placental barrier; therefore, DUPIXENT may be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus.
  • Lactation: There are no data on the presence of DUPIXENT in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Maternal IgG is known to be present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for DUPIXENT and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from DUPIXENT or from the underlying maternal condition.

Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information.


Indications

Atopic Dermatitis: DUPIXENT is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.

Asthma: DUPIXENT is indicated as an add-on maintenance treatment of adult and pediatric patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe asthma characterized by an eosinophilic phenotype or with oral corticosteroid dependent asthma. Limitation of Use: DUPIXENT is not indicated for the relief of acute bronchospasm or status asthmaticus.

Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP): DUPIXENT is indicated as an add-on maintenance treatment in adult patients with inadequately controlled CRSwNP.