Consider DUPIXENT for Your Adult Patients With Uncontrolled Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

You may have adult patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or for whom those therapies are not advisable. DUPIXENT may be an appropriate choice for these patients who are struggling to control their disease on prescription topical therapies. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids.1

When Topical Rx Therapies Are Not Enough...

Signs your adult patient with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis may be appropriate for DUPIXENT

Has tried a variety of topical prescription therapies and is still uncontrolled

  • Suffers from inadequate control of pruritus
  • Has ≥10% of their body covered with lesions and/or may involve problem areas such as the face, hands, and feet2
  • Has moderate-to-severe erythema and moderate-to-severe papulation/infiltration (IGA 3 or 4)

See below for results and examples of patients who might be appropriate for DUPIXENT.

Meet Carla:
Constantly Covering Up

The lesions on my face and hands are the worst.
Sometimes it’s hard to remember what it was
like without lesions.

—26-year-old teacher

Worried about her visible lesions

  • Worried about the visible lesions located on her face, hands, and arms
  • Feels obligated to explain to her students and their parents that her lesions are not contagious

Her atopic dermatitis remains uncontrolled despite being on regimens of topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors

  • Not adequately controlled despite having used a variety of topical prescription therapies
  • Uses emollients for moisturizing and topical corticosteroids several times a day

She is constantly concerned about the extent and severity of her lesions

  • Diagnosed 15 years ago
  • Suffers from uncontrolled disease with 12% of her body covered in lesions

Not actual patient. For illustrative purposes only.

Meet Issac:
Intense, Persistent Itch

Nearly every day, I find myself dealing with intense itch.

—37-year-old salesperson

Wants a treatment that works for him

  • Reports intense pruritus
  • Running out of options to treat his condition despite following countless doctors’ instructions and trying various treatments that did not adequately alleviate his itch
  • Experiences moderate lesions but is more distressed by intolerable itch

His atopic dermatitis remains uncontrolled despite use of topical prescription corticosteroids

  • Inadequate control of his pruritus during the day and at night
  • Uses antihistamines to help with pruritus at night
  • Bathes with emulsifying oils and applies an emollient immediately afterward

Suffering from atopic dermatitis with intense itching

  • Battling his disease for over 20 years
  • Has 20% of his body covered in lesions
  • Not an appropriate candidate to receive immunosuppressant therapy

Not actual patient. For illustrative purposes only.

Meet Tina:
Treated With Steroids, Still
Uncontrolled

I follow an intensive regimen of creams, but find myself
needing to use them more often to control my disease.

—43-year-old nurse

Constantly looking for help with her uncontrolled disease

  • Has been consistently treated with a variety of topical prescription corticosteroids but remains discouraged by a lack of control
  • Concerned her patients are hesitant to receive care from her during visible flares
  • Required to be on her feet several hours a day

Her atopic dermatitis remains uncontrolled despite treatment

  • Frequently washes her hands at work, which dries out her skin and causes exacerbations
  • Was often prescribed oral corticosteroids and intramuscular corticosteroid shots after experiencing intense flares
  • Has to use a humidifier to add moisture inside her home
  • Has tried phototherapy but chose not to continue it

Frustrated with the lack of control over the past 12 months despite current regimen of topical prescription corticosteroids

  • Suffering from the disease for the past 15 years, with often half of her body affected
  • Family history of atopy
  • Has not been able to control her disease despite her treatments and efforts to avoid potential triggers

Not actual patient. For illustrative purposes only.

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  1. EASI, Eczema Area and Severity Index; IGA, Investigator’s Global Assessment; NRS, numerical rating scale; Q2W, once every 2 weeks; TCS, topical corticosteroids.

Reference:
References:
  1. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  2. Simpson EL, Bieber T, Guttman-Yassky E, et al; SOLO 1 and SOLO 2 Investigators. Two phase 3 trials of dupilumab versus placebo in atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2335-2348.
  3. Blauvelt A, de Bruin-Weller M, Gooderham M, et al. Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (Liberty AD Chronos): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2017;389(10086):2287-2303.
  4. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  5. Gittler JK, Shemer A, Suárez-Fariñas M, et al. Progressive activation of TH2/TH22 cytokines and selective epidermal proteins characterizes acute and chronic atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012:130(6):1344-1354.
  6. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  7. Wei W, Anderson P, Gadkari A, et al. Extent and consequences of inadequate disease control among adults with atopic dermatitis. J Dermatol. 2018;45(2):150-157.
  8. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  9. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  10. Leshem YA, Hajar T, Hanifin JM, Simpson EL. What the Eczema Area and Severity Index score tells us about the severity of atopic dermatitis: an interpretability study. Br J Dermatol. 2015;172(5):1353-1357.
  11. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  12. Blauvelt A, de Bruin-Weller M, Gooderham M, et al. Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (Liberty AD Chronos): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2017;389(10086):2287-2303.
  13. Simpson EL, Bieber T, Guttman-Yassky E, et al; SOLO 1 and SOLO 2 Investigators. Two phase 3 trials of dupilumab versus placebo in atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2335-2348.
  14. EASI User Guide. HOME—Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema website. http://www.homeforeczema.org/documents/easi-user-guide-jan-2017-v3.pdf. Accessed July 11, 2018.
  15. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  16. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  17. Blauvelt A, de Bruin-Weller M, Gooderham M, et al. Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (Liberty AD Chronos): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2017;389(10086):2287-2303.
  18. Simpson EL, Bieber T, Guttman-Yassky E, et al; SOLO 1 and SOLO 2 Investigators. Two phase 3 trials of dupilumab versus placebo in atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2335-2348.
  19. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  20. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  21. Simpson EL, Bieber T, Guttman-Yassky E, et al; SOLO 1 and SOLO 2 Investigators. Two phase 3 trials of dupilumab versus placebo in atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2335-2348.
  22. Phan NQ, Blome C, Fritz F, et al. Assessment of pruritus intensity: prospective study on validity and reliability of the visual analogue scale, numerical rating scale and verbal rating scale in 471 patients with chronic pruritus. Acta Derm Venereol. 2012;92(5):502-507.
  23. Blauvelt A, de Bruin-Weller M, Gooderham M, et al. Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (Liberty AD Chronos): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2017;389(10086):2287-2303.
  24. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  25. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  26. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  27. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  28. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  29. Boguniewicz M, Alexis AF, Beck LA, et al. Expert perspectives on management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: a multidisciplinary consensus addressing current and emerging therapies. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017;5(6):1519-1531.
  30. Data on file, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  31. Torrelo A, Ortiz J, Alomar A, Ros S, Pedrosa E, Cuervo J. Health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction, and adherence to treatment in patients with moderate or severe atopic dermatitis on maintenance therapy: the CONDA-SAT study. Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2013;104(5):409-417.
  32. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.
  33. Gittler JK, Shemer A, Suárez-Fariñas M, et al. Progressive activation of TH2/TH22 cytokines and selective epidermal proteins characterizes acute and chronic atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;130(6):1344-1354.
  34. DUPIXENT Prescribing Information. October 2018.